Recovery is as Important as the Workout [part 2]

Part 1 showed a single workout. Part 2 shows the affects of repeated workouts.

According to Mens Journal [link], supercompensation is the secret to getting more from each workout in less time. On the one hand, if you workout too much your muscles will not recover instead becoming continually weaker. On the other hand if you workout too infrequently your body will regress back to baseline, and you will never improve.

Recovery is as Important as the Workout [part 1]

Part 1 shows a single workout. Part 2 will show the affects of repeated workouts.

According to Mens Journal [link], supercompensation is the secret to getting more from each workout in less time. On the one hand, if you workout too much your muscles will not recover instead becoming continually weaker. On the other hand if you workout too infrequently your body will regress back to baseline, and you will never improve.

5 Reasons Not to Wear a Wetsuit

It’s only natural that people should ask why we swim without wetsuits. The water in the San Francisco Bay varies is normally in the 50F range. That is cold compared to an 80F swimming pool or a 95F bath.

  • 212F Water Boils
  • 95F Hot Bath/Shower
  • 80F Swimming Pool
  • 63F San Francisco Bay Water Temperature (Summer)
  • 47F San Francisco Bay Water Temperature (Winter)
  • 32F Water Freezes

When folks ask me why I swim in cold water without a wetsuit I answer like this.

 

5 Reasons Not to Wear a Wetsuit

  1. Because we can’t… Swim competitions and Official channel crossings forbid wetsuits because they add buoyancy and give an unfair advantage compared to swimmers who swam prior to the existance of wetsuit technology.
  2. Because we don’t want to… Wetsuits are constricting and uncomfortable to wear.
  3. Wetsuits are a drag to put on a take off.
  4. Sauna feels better the colder we get.
  5. When you gotta go, you gotta go, but not in a wetsuit.
  
  
A shout-out to my high school friend Michelle Macy who posted a similar post on her blog.
  
  

Open Water Swimming History

Our friend Steven Munatones at the 10kswimmer blog compiled a list of historical moments in open water swimming. These swims are interesting to us since most of the 10DL challenges involve long distance open water swims, and the swims provide us with inspiration/ideas for our future 10DL challenges! To compile the list, he asked a panel of experts to  select 35 moments in open water swimming history that they hoped were representative of all that is heroic, impressive and memorable in the opean water swimming sport.

traversata-race

So according to the experts, the greatest moements in open water swimming history, in chronological, are:

 

1875: Matthew Webb (English Channel)
1896: Alfred Hajos (Athens Olympics)
1916: La Jolla Rough Water Swim (USA)
1926: Gertrude Ederle (English Channel)
1927: Channel Swimming Association
1927: George Young (Catalina Channel)
1927: Ernst Vierkotter (Canada)
1928: Mercedes Gleitze (Gibraltar Strait)
1947: Tom Blower (Irish Channel)
1950: Vansbrosimningen (Sweden)
1954: Traversata dello Stretto (Italy)
1956: Rottnest Channel Swim
1961: Antonio Abertondo (Channel)
1961: Keo Nakama (Molokai Channel)
1962: Barry Devonport (Cook Strait)
1963: Abo-Heif (Lake Michigan)
1967: Stewart Evan (Farallons)
1974: John Kinsella (WPMSF)
1978: Penny Dean (English Channel)
1985: FINA Long Distance Commission
1987: Lynne Cox (Bering Strait)
1991: Shelley Taylor-Smith (IMSA)
1986: Claudio Plit (Lac St-Jean)
2004: Midmar Mile (South Africa)
2005: IOC (Beijing Olympic 10K)
2006: Agua (Santa Fe-Coronda)
2007: Lewis Pugh (North Pole)
2007: Petar Stoychev (English Channel)
2008: Natalie du Toit (Olympic 10K)
2008: Grant Hackett & David Davies
2008: Larisa Ilchenko (Olympic 10K)
2008: Maarten van der Weijden
2008: Britain’s Olympic 10K Team
2008: Hong Kong Clean Half